How To Ace A Group Interview

 

How To Ace A Group Interview 

What is a group interview?

Group interviews tend to go one of two ways. They can be either be part a group discussion or a group activity. On the one hand, group discussions tend to focus on presenting yourself to the group and answering interview styled questions. On the other hand, a group activity will concentrate on carrying out a team project which of course, highlights how well you work in a team environment and your problem-solving skills.

Group interviews with multiple candidates are effective because they allow employers to compare potential employees and see which candidates perform better in a group environment. Furthermore, group interviews also give insight into a person’s personality and how well they would fit into the company culture.

 

How to ace a group interview

  • Interacting with other candidates - While other candidates might be your competition, it is important to socialise with them before the interview begins. This shows employers that you are an interactive team player and you are willing to network with others. Therefore, striking up a conversation with the person next to you has its advantages (and it can also calm those nerves)!
  • Group activities - Interviews which involve group activities such as role-playing and presenting concentrate more on teamwork, leadership and problem-solving. These type of group interviews mean that you have to find the right balance between standing out from the crowd yet not being the loudest person in the room so that it does not comes across aggressive. By including every member of your team, taking leadership on important aspects of the task and of course, by being yourself throughout the process will not go unacknowledged.
  • Group discussions - In terms of a group discussion interview, these tend to consist of interview questions targeted at the whole group. This way the employer can pick up on the creativity to your answer as well as compare your answers to that of other candidates. Some of these might be unusual interview questions which are designed to reveal more about your character and personality, not to mention they also challenge you when you are under stress. For example, in the past, I have been asked questions such as ‘If you were an animal, what animal would you be and why?’ Now, we all hate these types of questions but the key is to state good reasons for why you picked your answer and stay away from the generic answers.
  • Confidence - Standing out in a group interview situation all comes down to confidence. Even if you are an introverted person, remember being the loudest in the room is not going to necessarily land you a job, but instead answering the questions with confidence, smiling and making eye contact really go a long way and convey confidence even if you may be lacking in that area.
  • Follow up - If you feel like you did not make a good enough impression during the interview, following up at the end of the interview and thanking the interviewer for the opportunity is a great way of leaving a great impression. Also sending a thank you note may be something that not many other candidates will think of, yet will be appreciated by the interviewer.

 

Written by Jessie Randhawa